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 May 16-May 19, 2019
Lazy Susan Gallery

The accumulation of color + texture, intent + error, labor + time is the amassing of meaning as oil paint on canvas. The undertow of influence gathers identity, memory, and mimesis together in drift, a three-day exhibition of new paintings by Gregg Bautista, Sam Pullin, and Fabricio Suarez.
On the second evening of the exhibition, composer Brian Lawlor will immerse drift in a site specific soundscape, manifesting cross-medium currents through live performance.

1:00 - 11:00 pm gallery hours
6:00 - 11:00 pm opening party feat. VIDAL

may 16. 

1:00 - 10:00 pm gallery hours
8:00 - 9:00 pm brian lawlor plays new music

may 17.  

1:00 - 6:00 pm gallery hours
3:00 - 4:00  pm artist talk
3:00 - 6:00 pm closing reception

may 18.  

Gregg Bautista

“is a painter whose work explores the experiences of Latinx migrants, as well as his own Andean heritage. Gregg is interested in how identity is affected by the circumstances of cultural assimilation or integration, displacement, and ideological shifts resulting from migration…Inspired by traditional Andean weaving, in addition to oral history as record, he views the intertwining of conversations, research, and visual spaces as a manner of collaborating with individuals, cultures, and time. He seeks to use the spaces created in his paintings to take himself into his cultural past while bringing the past to himself. Equally, he aims to use the collaborative exchanges and resulting works as a platform to celebrate and share stories from those who are otherwise underrepresented. Gregg received his BFA from Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University, and currently works out of Newark, NJ.”

Sam Pullin

“is a multimedia artist living and working in Jersey City, NJ. He has exhibited extensively in galleries across the Tristate Area, Philadelphia, and Maine. Pullin has painted several public pieces, including Spaceman II, a large scale astronaut-based trompe l’oeil. In 2017, Pullin was an ESKFF artist in residence at Mana Contemporary. In addition to his visual art practice, Pullin is the drummer for Cruelty, a Jersey City based sludge metal band.

Grounded in his early life in Jersey City, Pullin’s practice is focused on the deterioration of societal, economic, and political systems. Using allegorical imagery, Pullin explores institutional and individual conformity to established and fringe structures of value. Pullin’s practice is that of an urban surrealist: His juxtaposition of unanticipated objects and figures; subjects and materials is at once dreamlike and disillusioning.”

Brian Lawlor

“is a composer, multi-instrumentalist, performer, and educator residing in Jersey City. A fervent collaborator, he is the music director for Seattle theater group Saint Genet -- conducting, composing, and performing for/with a variety of ensembles (from chamber orchestra to synth trio). Recent engagements include On the Boards, Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, DonauFestival, New Island Festival, and Works & Process at the Guggenheim. Lawlor earned a BM from Cornish College of the Arts, an MM from SUNY Purchase, and studied at the Koninklijk Conservatorium in Den Haag. In 2005, he was named Keogh Dwyer Correctional Facility's ‘most promising inmate.’” 

Fabricio Suarez

“is an artist from Uruguay working in Jersey City, NJ. He received a BFA in Fine Arts and illustration from the School of Visual Arts, where he was awarded the David Rhodes President Scholarship. Between 2005 and 2009 Suarez published eight children’s books as a freelance illustrator. His paintings have been shown in numerous group exhibitions in NJ, NY & LA. He has participated in residencies with ESKFF at Mana Contemporary in Jersey City, and Artists Off-the-Grid in Red Feather Lakes, Colorado.

Suarez’s current studio practice is a nod to both Abstract and Baroque ideas. Where wild abstract brushstrokes act as ‘characters” that form a narrative in the landscape. Grotesque portraits and ghostly images hunt the Royals in these paintings. ‘Like putting Goya and Bosch and Richter in a blender.’”